oriental neighborhoods that you need to visit

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Chinatown, New York

This is the Chinatown of our imagery: narrow streets filled with vendors, signs that combine English with Mandarin, and restaurants typical of each corner of the country of origin. But you’d be wrong to assume that there’s only hustle and bustle there: in the early morning, you can see people practicing Tai Chi Chuan to the sound of meditation music at Columbus Park.

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Barrio Chino, Havana

Up until the late 1950s, Havana was home to around 50,000 Chinese people. This number has been drastically reduced in recent decades, but the Chinese-Cuban tradition is maintained in the typical arches that adorn the streets, the newspaper Kwong Wah Po (the only bilingual newspaper in the country in English and Chinese), and restaurants like Tien Tan, which serves over 100 dishes.

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Quartier Chinois, Paris

The main Asian stronghold in the French capital is in the 13th arrondissement. The region is home to Vietnamese and Chinese immigrants, who dominate the streets with neon signs and shops selling typical products, like the Paris Store. In addition to the shopping and food options, there you can also observe a mass in Cantonese and buy custom products made with Oriental herbs.

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Barrio Chino, Buenos Aires

While exploring the neighborhood of Belgrano, at the intersection of Avenida Juramento and Calle Arribeños you can see the change in scenery. This Chinese neighborhood may be small (the main portion stretches for just two blocks), but it welcomes almost 20,000 visitors each weekend. There you’ll find stores selling knick-knacks, Oriental markets, and flower shops with native plants.

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Liberdade, São Paulo

The city is home to approximately 33,000 Japanese immigrants – it’s the largest Japanese community outside of Japan. The best representation of their culture can be found in the neighborhood of Liberdade, in downtown São Paulo, with streets decorated with suzuranto lanterns and filled with restaurants. A geek paradise, Sogo Plaza is a gallery that sells manga, anime, and items from the otaku world.

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Koreatown, Los Angeles

The region has many Korean elements, from the barbecue restaurants to the stores selling K-pop items. In addition to the Oriental traditions and the California atmosphere, the neighborhood is also home to a large Latino population. In other words, it’s common to hear people speaking English, Spanish, and Korean at the same time.

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Chinatown, Melbourne

The gold rush in the 19th century brought many Chinese immigrants to Australia. Chinatown is in the heart of the city and, among short brick buildings, you’ll find Cantonese restaurants, shops selling medicinal herbs, and the Chinese Museum, home to the largest dragon in the world.